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Individual Wells

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Keep your well, well.

An individual well serves a single family home. To keep your drinking water safe, test your well once a year for bacteria and every three years for nitrate. See Water Quality and Testing for more information.

Get a Permit.

If you want to drill a new well, know the requirements.

Information for well owners.

Decommissioning/abandoned wells

Wells no longer in use can lead to contaminated groundwater and pose a safety risk to children, adults and animals.

Where do I look for abandoned wells?

  • Old pump houses, storage sheds, old detached garages and small building structures on the property.
  • Hand dug wells are often in lowland areas near surface water.

Look for these signs of an old well:

  • A steel, 6-inch diameter, well casing.
  • Old concrete or brick-lined structures.
  • Old water system components (pumps, plumbing and pressure tanks).
  • Open space under pump house floors.
  • Wooden or cement hatch-like openings to vaults and wellheads.

Records of old wells:

  • Asbuilt look-up.
  • Washington State Department of Ecology Well Log Viewer.
  • Neighbors who have lived in the area for many years can also be a good source of information.

What should I do if I have an abandoned well?

  • You are required to decommission a well that is no longer in use.
  • Contact a licensed well driller.
  • Complete a Health Department Well Decommissioning Application.

Questions?

Contact us at ehdrinkingwater@tpchd.org or (253) 798-6470.

 

 

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